Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization -- Department for Nonlinear Dynamics and Network Dynamics Group
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12.10.2014 Artensterben als Kettenreaktion

Ein neues mathematisches Modell erklärt, unter welchen Bedingungen es zu massenhaftem Artensterben kommen kann

10.03.2014 9th International Summer School / Conference on Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics in Maribor, Slovenia

The 9th International Summer School / Conference "Let's Face Chaos Through Nonlinear Dynamics" in Maribor, Slovenia is dedicated to Theo Geisel's 65th birthday.

The conference takes place from 22 June to 6 July.  For more information, follow this link.

11.10.2013 Wissenschaftliche Premiere in Ulugbek-Madrasa

Vor außergewöhnlicher, historischer Kulisse treffen sich Physiker aus 13 Ländern in Usbekistan zu einer Konferenz über komplexe nichtlineare Systeme. Einer der Veranstalter ist das MPIDS.

01.07.2013 20.06.2013

Theo Geisel elected member of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities

14.06.2013 Otto-Hahn-Medaille für MPIDS-Forscher

Die Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zeichnet heute Wolfgang Keil für herausragende wissenschaftliche Leistungen in seiner Doktorarbeit aus. Der Forscher hat dazu beigetragen aufzuklären, wie sich die Aufgabenverteilung im Gehirn selbst organisiert.

09.10.2012 A glance at the brain’s circuit diagram

 

A new method facilitates the mapping of connections between neurons

 

The human brain accomplishes its remarkable feats through the interplay of an unimaginable number of neurons that are interconnected in complex networks. A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, the University of Göttingen and the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Göttingen has now developed a method for decoding neural circuit diagrams. Using measurements of total neuronal activity, they can determine the probability that two neurons are connected with each other.

13.08.2012 Continuous Percolation with Discontinuities

Continuous Percolation with Discontinuities

18.06.2012 Self-organization of electric power grid dynamics

In future smart grids, the distribution of consumer demands shall be controlled as to efficiently match electric power production. Such control requires a through understanding of how the grid self-organizes its collective dynamics in the absence of control. We are now providing a new perpective using mathematical oscillator models of power grids.

 

One main conclusion: adding new connection lines may not only help but also prevent power grid synchrony and thus cause power outage.

 

Article in the Max Planck Reseach Magazine (German, 8.5MB)

 

Editors Suggestion at Physical Review Letters,

prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v109/i6/e064101

highlighted in Physics

http://physics.aps.org/synopsis-for/10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.064101

 

second article at New Journal of Physics on Braess' paradox

http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1367-2630/14/8/083036

 

Dirk Witthaut and Marc Timme

Network Dynamics Group

18.06.2012 Chaos im Kopf?

Michael Monteforte vom MPIDS erhält die Otto-Hahn-Medaille der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

18.06.2012 Small World Formula

The collective dynamics on small world networks emerge in a broad range of systems including neural circuits, epidemic spreading networks and chemical reactions. Here a mathematical formula is provided that systematically predicts the dynamics on such networks.

 

Reference: Phys. Rev. Lett. 108:218701, 2012

http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v108/i21/e218701

22.05.2012 The living fossils of brain evolution

Göttingen scientists reconstruct a radical change during the evolution of the brain.

06.05.2012 Non-Additive Amplifier in Neural Circuits

 

Non-additivity enables synchrony propagation in recurrent networks

So far, models of neural circuits typically assume that inputs to a neuron add linearly and are only nonlinearly processed thereafter. Recent experiments show that a non-additive processing acts at single neurons if excitatory inputs appear synchronously and in sufficient proximity on the dendrite. The current study now provides a systematic view on how such non-additivity impacts the collective dynamics of networks.

One main finding is that even purely random networks may exhibit robust propagation of synchronous activity (synfire chain activity) even without superimposed feed-forward structures (so far known as synfire anatomy).

Raoul-Martin Memmesheimer and Marc Timme (PLoS Comput. Biol. 8:e1002384, 2012)

File: journal.pcbi.1002384.pdf

08.12.2011 Chaos Despite Symmetry

The collective dynamics of many systems in biology and physics are well characterized by strongly coupled limit cycle oscillators, ranging from certain neural circuits to coupled Josephson junctions. So far it was believed that symmetry in these system forces the collective dynamics to be regular, for instance periodic. A new study has now uncovered that equally chaos can emerge in such system, and in which forms it does.

The study is published in Physical Review Letters

Christian Bick, Danilo Paulikat, Dirk Rathlef, Marc Timme, Peter Ashwin,
Phys. Rev. Lett. 107:244101 (2011)
and made its title page (issue of 9th of December)

27.11.2011 Coloring Musical Rhythms with Colored Noise

Max Planck researchers discover the statistical laws governing rhythmic fluctuations in human musical performances.

25.08.2011 Travelling epidemics

Human mobility patterns and their impact on the spread of epidemics.

23.06.2011 Impact of microscopic motility on the overall swimming behaviour of parasites

The causative agent of African sleeping sickness, annually responsible for several thousands of deaths in Africa and South America, is a motile cell: it propels itself through its host's bloodstream until -- in the last stage of the disease -- it overcomes the blood-brain-barrier and penetrates its victim's brain. In order to fight this deadly disease, scientists are trying to understand the parasite's exact patterns of movement. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS) in Germany as well as from the Universities of Würzburg, Göttingen and Basel have now succeeded in identifying three different swimming modes. In addition, they were able to show for the first time, that these swimming modes correspond to the shape and stiffness of the parasite.

15.03.2011 Working faster in a team

Scientists from Göttingen discover why neurons are experts at processing data quickly.

20.01.2011 The pace of forgetting

Scientists from Göttingen are able to calculate for the first time how long neural networks in the cerebral cortex are capable of memorizing sensory information.

17.01.2011 Beating the competition

A single new connection can dramatically enhance the size of a network – no matter whether this connection represents an additional link in the Internet, a new acquaintance within a circle of friends or a connection between two nerve cells in the brain. The results, which are published in Nature Physics, were part of a theoretical study carried out by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS), the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Göttingen and the University Göttingen. This study mathematically describes for the first time the influence of single additional links in a network. Jan Nagler, Anna Levina, and Marc Timme, Nature Physics, published online on January 16th, 2011, DOI: 10.1038/nphys1860

02.01.2011 Bernstein Lecture Series WS 2010/2011

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

This semester the Bernstein Lecture Series invites outstanding female researchers in the field of biophysics to speak in Göttingen. The scientists from the USA, Germany and the United Kingdom will not only give an overview over their work, but also allow young female researchers and students to meet experienced and successful role-models.

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesWS11.pdf

04.11.2010 Self-Organization instead of Environment and Genes

Certain parts of the brain of different species such as ferrets, tree shrews, and galagos are exactly the same. Self-organized processes in brain development offer the only possible explanation.

16.08.2010 Das Denken verstehen: Forschung am Bernstein Zentrum Göttingen wird erneut gefördert

BMBF unterstützt erfolgreichen Forschungsverbund für weitere fünf Jahre mit 8,5 Millionen Euro

06.08.2010 Growing brain is particularly flexible

Max Planck scientists have investigated how the brain changes during growth

03.08.2010 Counting Catastrophes

Law describing the number of so-called caustics within a flow discovered.

06.04.2010 Bernstein Lecture Series SS 2010

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

This semester the Bernstein Lecture Series invites outstanding female researchers in the field of biophysics to speak in Göttingen. The scientists from the USA, Germany and France will not only give an overview over their work, but also allow young female researchers and students to meet experienced and successful role-models.

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesSS10_2.pdf

22.03.2010 Nerve cells pay attention to their neighbors

Scientists develop a mathematical model to explain how nerve cells coordinate their activity

03.02.2010 Organized Chaos gets Robot going

Chaos control aids large behavioral repertoire of autonomous robot
File: SelfOrganizedAdapationFinal.pdf

14.10.2009 Why the left brain hemisphere matches the right

Long-range connections between neurons coordinate the development between different
brain regions.

12.10.2009 Bernstein Lecture Series WS 2009/2010

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

This semester the Bernstein Lecture Series invites outstanding female researchers in the field of biophysics to speak in Göttingen. The scientists from the USA and Israel will not only give an overview over their work, but also allow young female researchers and students to meet experienced and successful role-models.

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesWS0910.pdf

06.08.2009 Otto Hahn Medal awarded to A. Levina

Dr. Anna Levina was awarded with the Otto Hahn Medal of the Max Planck Society for her work on self-organized criticality in neuronal systems.

Link to full press release (in German) on the site of the Max Planck Insitute for Dynamics and Self-Organization.

07.07.2009 Gentner-Kastler prize awarded to Theo Geisel

Prof. Dr. Theo Geisel received the 2009 German-French Gentner-Kastler prize by the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (German Physical Society) and the Société Française de Physique (French Physical Society) for his outstanding contributions to nonlinear dynamics. He applied the theory of nonlinear dynamics (commonly known as chaos theory) to various complex systems, like chaotic transport in semiconductor nanostructures, spreading of epidemics or fundamental concepts of brain function.

Click here for the report in the Journal of the German Physics Society
File: Pressemitteilung_GERMAN.pdf

04.06.2009 The script for brain development

Scientists analyze the mathematical principles underlying the development of the visual cortex.

Bernstein Lecture Series SS 2009

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

This semester the Bernstein Lecture Series invites outstanding female researchers in the field of biophysics to speak in Göttingen. The scientists from the USA and Germany will not only give an overview over their work, but also allow young female researchers and students to meet experienced and successful role-models.

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesSS09.pdf

16.02.2009 A New Kind of Counting

How many different sudokus are there? How many different ways are there to color in the countries on a map? And how do spins arrange in anti-ferromagnets? Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen and at Cornell University (Ithaca, USA) have now developed a new computational method that quickly provides an answers to these questions. The theorists present a novel counting method and implement it using modern symbolic computation software originally developed for precision high-energy physics. (New Journal of Physics, February 4, 2009)
http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/1367-2630/11/2/023001/

Bernstein Lecture Series WS 2008/2009

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

This semester the Bernstein Lecture Series invites outstanding female researchers in the field of biophysics to speak in Göttingen. The scientists from the USA and Germany will not only give an overview over their work, but also allow young female researchers and students to meet experienced and successful role-models.

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesWS08.pdf

17.07.2008 Otto-Hahn medal awarded to R.-M. Memmesheimer

Dr. Raoul-Martin Memmesheimer was awarded with the Otto-Hahn medal "for his theoretical studies on temporally precise patterns in neural activity, which also explain experimental key findings qualitatively."

External Link to full press release (in German).

Bernstein Lecture Series SS 2008

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

This semester the Bernstein Lecture Series invites outstanding female researchers in the field of biophysics to speak in Göttingen. The scientists from the USA and Germany will not only give an overview over their work, but also allow young female researchers and students to meet experienced and successful role-models. This semester’s focus is on neural networks and brain research. On Tuesday, July 8th, Prof. Dr. Elly Nevidi from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston will talk about a dynamic zone defining interneuron remodeling in the adult neocortex.

The Lecture Series is organized by female PhD students from all divisions of the Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization. Their aim is to help young female scientists in establishing a network of colleagues devoted to similar fields of research. At the same time the students can profit from the experiences the renowned lecturers made working and researching in different countries and get hands-on advice for their career planning.

 

The lectures are open to the public and can be a helpful experience for female students and researchers working in all fields of science. Before the talks, the invited scientists will give a short tutorial for interested students.

For a complete program, click on the pdf-file below. 

 

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesSS08.pdf

01.02.2008 Thinking too complicated?

Neuronal activity may sometimes be far more predictable than has been assumed until now

How sensitive are neuronal networks to external interference? To what extent are neuronal network processes incudung the thinking patterns of the brain predefined? These questions have been investigated by Sven Jahnke, Raoul-Martin Memmesheimer and Marc Timme at the Bernstein Center for Computional Neuroscience and the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organisation. They have found out that, under certain conditions, neuronal networks are more predictable than was previously assumed (Physical Review Letters, Feb. 1st, 2008)

18.11.2007 The brain on the edge of chaos

About a recent publication in Nature Physics by Levina, Herrmann and
Geisel about neuronal avalanches.
File: The brain on the edge of chaos.pdf

Who's with whom?

The mathematical analysis of regulatory networks is becoming increasingly important in different fields of biology - since such networks exist everywhere in nature. Species of animals and plants in an ecosystem, genes and proteins in a cell or neurons in the brain constitute networks of interacting units. Marc Timme, researcher at the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience and at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen, has now developed a mathematical method to infer the circuitry structure of a regulatory network from its dynamical response properties. The implementation of this theoretical method can make it possible to determine the exact connections between the units of a network - for example, the interaction between the molecules of a cell or the connections in a neuronal network. The study will appear in June in the scientific journal "Physical Review Letters".

Bernstein Lecture Series 2007

Selected chapters of Biophysics written by outstanding female scientists.

The female PhD students of this institute, working in all divisions of the MPI, were given the opportunity to regularly invite excellent female scientists. The outstanding female scientists who will give lectures and present their work during the semester will serve as a positive example of how perseverance and strong commitment to science can lead to success. This lecture series aims to offer the possibility to meet, exchange experiences and facilitate career planning for young female researchers.

File: BernsteinLectureSeriesWS07.pdf

The scaling laws of human travel

D. Brockmann, L. Hufnagel, and T. Geisel, Nature (2006)

Please go check the Media Reports side
File: PressReleaseEnglish.pdf